Please help improve it or discuss these issues gay pride parades near me the talk page. This article relies largely or entirely on a single source.

Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. This article may contain an excessive amount of intricate detail that may only interest a specific audience. American gay rights activist, communist, labor advocate, and Native American civil rights campaigner. Born to an upper middle class family in England, Hay was raised in Chile and California. From an early age he acknowledged his same-sex sexual attraction, and came under the influence of Marxism.

Hay’s developing belief in the cultural minority status of homosexuals led him to take a stand against the assimilationism advocated by the majority of gay rights campaigners. Hay has been described as “the Founder of the Modern Gay Movement” and “the father of gay liberation”, and has been the subject of a biography and documentary film. Their second child, Margaret “Peggy” Caroline Hay, was born in February 1914, but following the outbreak of the First World War the family moved to Northern Chile, where Hay Sr. Chuquicamata by the Guggenheim family’s Anaconda Company. In May 1916, his brother John “Jack” William was born. Los Angeles High School, where Hay studied. Hay was enrolled at Cahuenga Elementary School, where he excelled at his studies but was bullied.

During the summer holidays, Hay’s father sent him to work on his cousin’s cattle ranch in Smith Valley, Nevada. The little pockets existed and either you were lucky enough to fall into them or you could go your whole life and not know about them. Harry Hay on Los Angeles’ gay scene in the 1930s. Graduating from school in 1929, Hay hoped to study paleontology, but was forbidden from doing so by his father, who insisted that he pursue law. In 1930 Hay enrolled at Stanford University to study international relations, taking independent study courses in English, history, and political science. Relocating to Los Angeles, Hay moved back in with his parents. He associated with artistic and theatrical circles, befriending composer John Cage and his lover Don Sample, with the former getting Hay to perform vocals at one of his concerts in November 1932.

It was while working on a play that Hay met actor Will Geer, with whom he entered into a relationship. Geer was a committed leftist, with Hay later describing him as his political mentor. Hay was perturbed at the Party’s hostility to homosexuals and its view that same-sex attraction was a deviance resulting from bourgeois society. Hay began Jungian analysis in 1937.

The Communist Party of Canada was marching as well, though it seems they have forgotten that under communism homosexuality has been always illegal. Hay’s developing belief in the cultural minority status of homosexuals led him to take a stand against the assimilationism advocated by the majority of gay rights campaigners. Mattachine’s structure was based partly on that of the Communist Party and partly on fraternal brotherhoods like Freemasonry. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. You Americans don’t know Jewish treachery, but you will.

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Hay find himself a “boyish girl”. The couple moved to Manhattan, New York City, where Hay went through a series of unsteady and low-paid jobs, including as a scriptwriter, a service manager in Macy’s toy department, and a marketing strategy planner. Red Hills” due to its large left-wing community. In September 1943, Hay and his wife adopted a daughter, Hannah Margaret, soon moving to a larger home nearby to accommodate her. They adopted a second daughter, Kate Neall, several days after her birth in December 1945.

The post-war reaction, the shutting down of open communication, was already of concern to many of us progressives. I knew the government was going to look for a new enemy, a new scapegoat. Influenced by the publication of the Kinsey Report, Hay conceived the idea of a homosexual activist group in August 1948. After signing a petition for Progressive Party presidential candidate Henry A. Hay met Rudi Gernreich in July 1950, with the pair soon entering a relationship. Gernreich shared many of Hay’s leftist ideas, and was impressed by The Call. He became an enthusiastic financial supporter of the venture, although he did not lend his name to it, going instead by the initial “R”.

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In September they gained a divorce on the grounds of Hay’s “extreme cruelty” and he moved out of their home. Mattachine’s structure was based partly on that of the Communist Party and partly on fraternal brotherhoods like Freemasonry. Operating on the Leninist basis of democratic centralism, it had cells, oaths of secrecy and five different levels of membership, each of which required greater levels of involvement and commitment. Following the Jennings trial, the group expanded rapidly, with founders estimating membership in California by May 1953 at over 2,000 with as many as 100 people joining a typical discussion group.

Hay’s relationship with Kamgren was strained, and he was bored by a life of domesticity and annoyed with Kamgren’s controlling and regimented nature. They had little in common, with Kamgren not sharing Hay’s interest in political activism, instead being conservative and, in Hay’s words, “petty bourgeois”. Feeling that he was being restrained by the relationship, Hay left Kamgren, in 1963 beginning a brief relationship with Jim Kepner. In May 1971, Hay and Burnside moved to San Juan Pueblo in New Mexico, taking their kaleidoscope factory with them, thereby providing jobs for the economically deprived area. They soon fitted into the community, gaining many friends, both with local gays and members of the Native Tewa people. After this, he involved himself in the foundation of a local LGBT rights group, the Lambdas de Santa Fe, designed to fight homophobic violence in northern New Mexico. The group sponsored a gay ball and in June 1977 held Alburquerque’s first Gay Pride Parade.